The cities most ready to work from home | Lifestyle

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Since March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic has moved a record number of Americans to work from home. Due to the nationwide surge in cases of COVID, recent CDC guidelines suggest that workers should be allowed to work in remote areas if possible. Many jobs are suitable for remote work environments, but most are not. Using data from the Census Bureau and a recent survey by researchers at the University of Chicago, about 31% of US workers engage in remote-friendly jobs, which varies significantly at the geographical level. Moreover, not everyone who works in a profession that can be run remotely is in a good position to do so. The difference between computers and high-speed Internet access, and the space available in the home, all affect an individual’s readiness for remote work.

Working from home usually requires both a computer and a high-speed internet connection. Nearly a quarter of US households do not own a computer, and nearly 30% lack broadband Internet such as cables, fiber optics, and DSLs, according to Census data. Not surprisingly, owning a computer and using the high-speed Internet tends to be inextricably linked. At the state level, even in states where more households own computers, more households are using the high-speed Internet. At the regional level, the South is not ready to work from home. In southern states, home computer ownership is low and few households tend to use broadband Internet.

The cities most ready to work from home | Lifestyle

Source link The cities most ready to work from home | Lifestyle